Globe’s GoSurf Plans Analysis

Pesos Mb Mb per peso Peso per Mb Days Mb per Day
10 40 4.000 0.250 1 40
15 40 2.667 0.375 2 20
30 100 3.333 0.300 1 100
50 350 7.000 0.143 3 117
50* 700 14.000 0.071 3 233
50* 350 7.000 0.143 7 50
99 200 2.020 0.495 30 7
199 500 2.513 0.398 30 17
299 1500 5.017 0.199 30 50
499 3000 6.012 0.166 30 100
999 5000 5.005 0.200 30 167
1799 10000 5.559 0.180 30 333
2499 15000 6.002 0.167 30 500

* Prepaid only

Some observations:

  • Prepaid have the best deal in terms of cost per MB with the newest GoSURF 50 promo. Useful if you need to upload/download in a pinch.
  • GoSURF 499 is best value for money for 30 day plans.
  • Because there’s a No bill shock protection cap on Php 1,500, it’s almost never worth getting the 1799 and 2499 plans.

ER, Confinement and HMO Plans

My 1 year old nephew got sick recently and it was an instant Php 10,000 ER trip. As I build my emergency fund, I sometimes get scared that I’m just 1 hospital trip away from starting back from scratch (or worse.) *knocks on wood*

So, I asked Uniguarantee (one of our clients, an insurance brokerage firm, no website yet :(, here’s a reference ) on what my options were.

I had 3 levels that I can cover: ER, Confinement and Health Maintenance.

Continue reading ER, Confinement and HMO Plans

Fear of rejection

I remember the last time I’ve had panic attacks. We were new to the work, and I knew about it in theory, but did not have first-hand experience with it. This was the first time, but I gave my 100% and researched the heck out of it but the client rejected our work.

I was devastated. As a result, I kept putting off having them check our work again. The project dragged on, and as a result, is delayed by a long time.

Oddly enough, I know that it’s all in my head. That failure in one thing isn’t really a failure if I learn from it and turn it into a success.

I know that. In theory.

I’ve tried to acknowledge the fear. Many times. By calling it out.

Nobody is perfect. You can make mistakes. You’re just scared.

But I guess I still need lots of practice.

Where there was smoke (Me and my friends’ fire survival story)

As some of you probably already know, there was a fire at Prince David Condo, a building in front of Ateneo Friday afternoon.

What most of you probably did not know, my friends and I was there. We were at the top most floor, right below the roof deck.

Photo lifted from https://anc.yahoo.com/news/fire-breaks-out-at-qc-condo-055800824.html
Photo lifted from https://anc.yahoo.com/news/fire-breaks-out-at-qc-condo-055800824.html

Thankfully, we all survived.

Here’s our story, from my POV.

Continue reading Where there was smoke (Me and my friends’ fire survival story)

Fair programmer market value

I sometimes get asked “As a programmer, how much is my per hour rate?” or in another form “What’s my market value?”

The simple answer to this is that your market value is whatever price you agree to get paid for. That sounds like very passive so I’ll rephrase it.

Some people would say I'm overpaid, but I'm not. I'm paid exactly what the market will bear, which means I'm paid what I'm worth. - s2e04
Some people would say I’m overpaid, but I’m not. I’m paid exactly what the market will bear, which means I’m paid what I’m worth. – s2e04

Anything’s value, according to a market, is the highest price someone is willing to buy it at and the lowest price someone is willing to sell it at. It’s what we call the market clearance.

Your value is whatever price you agree to sell yourself at. If your price is above market clearance, then you might be overpriced. If your price is below the market clearance, then you are underpriced.

I would argue that on a personal level, the market clearance should not matter much on fields where there are massive demand and not enough supply (e.g. programmers). The market can usually bear the price.

Then the matter of market value becomes agreeing upon a price and that increasing your market value is simply agreeing to a price higher than your current.

Setting a higher price is simple, but not easy. What makes it so hard to ask for more?

Of cats and cups

Everything in this world is a duality. It’s both something and nothing, ethical and unethical, rational and irrational, good and bad.

The secret to happiness and success is by realizing that the world is both black and white and that humans interpret which shade of gray it is.

The cup is both alive and dead and the cat half-empty and half-full.

9 Things to keep in mind when making a decision

I’ve had the ‘privilege’ to make some difficult decisions in my life (with more to come). Some of them were decisions that brought me a lot of opportunities. Some of them were mistakes that I just have to live with. Regardless, I don’t have a lot of regrets.

Here are some of the things I try to keep in mind when I make a decision:

  1. Good data does not guarantee a good decision.
  2. You will always have incomplete information.
  3. Always take into account opportunity cost.
  4. A true binary option decision is rare. Look for a third option.
  5. Not deciding is a decision in itself. At least acknowledge that you’re deciding to not decide.
  6. You make the best decision based on all available information that you have and then face the consequences, good or bad.
  7. Good or bad is in the eye of the beholder.
  8. No decision is really final. Even supreme court decisions can be overturned.
  9. You are human. You’ll make mistakes. Don’t beat yourself too much.

Personal Finance: The software that I use

I’ve talked about the personal finance wisdom I’ve picked up so far and as I’ve said, you can’t improve things you don’t keep track of.

“But keeping track of finances is hard!” you say.

Yes, indeed; but with the help of software (or four), I’ve managed to keep track of all of my expenses for the past year without fail.

1) Good ole’ Spreadsheet
Nothing beats the good ole’ spreadsheet. I use this to keep track of my credit card. I’ve devised of a system on how I pay for my credit card in a way that allows me to pay for certain items in particular. This means, the amount I pay to my credit card is exactly the cost of one (or more) items. When I pay my credit card Php 2,433.45, it was for 6 different things I’ve bought 3 months ago. This way, I avoid the anxiety of not knowing what I’m paying for, and this helps me keep track what exactly I’m using my credit card on.

2) Toshl
This is, by far, the easiest software I’ve used on mobile. It really helps me record my expenses the moment I make them or shortly right after. I’m on Pro, as I need the multiple incomes, but the free tier is plenty useful by itself.

3) Splitwise
If Toshl helps me keep track of my expenses, Splitwise helps me keep track of personal debt. I know who owes me and exactly how much. I also know who I owe and exactly how much.

It’s made our – me and my roommates – lives easier. Someone’s paid the electricity? Record it in Splitwise. Someone’s bought groceries? Splitwise. When someone sees their debt ballooning, they pay in cash and record it in Splitwise.

I also use this to keep track of reimbursements, along with a spreadsheet.

4) YNAB
This was a new addition. Recently, my expenses now closely track my income which means I don’t get to save as I did before. On top of that, my savings has been wiped out because of an emergency. So, I needed to budget and budget well. But more than the software, what’s more useful is YNAB’s methodology. The methodology takes some time getting used to as it’s an entirely different mindset on how to approach budgeting. Good thing that the software makes applying the methodology really easy. The full price is pretty steep though (USD 60), but it’s an investment.

YNAB is pretty redundant with Toshl, but I like the ease of use of Toshl so I’m keeping both. I just consolidate Toshl’s entries at the end of the day and record it on YNAB in consolidated categories.

That’s about it. I’ll talk about my workflow and how I manage this mess of numbers in the next post.